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Close to the Human Lifeworld

Another characteristic of primary orality that Ong discusses is that it is close to the human lifeworld. This is to say that since they have no real way to structure information that can stand on it’s own, somewhat separated from human experience, "… oral cultures must conceptualize and verbaliz...

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Tertiary Orality … Continued

In this post, I return to the conversation about whether digital orality is part of the secondary orality or can be considered a tertiary orality (see post on 11.12.07) and whether there is anything in the current age and level of orality that can be seen as a return to orality (see entire section o...

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Oral Genealogy is Ephemeral

"Narrators narrate what audiences call for or will tolerate. When the market for a printed book declines, the presses stop rolling but thousands of copies may remain. When the market for an oral genealogy disappears, so does the genealogy itself, utterly." (66). This is certainly logical in consi...

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Conservative and/or Traditionalist

"Oral societies must invest great energy in saying over and over again what has been learned arduously over the ages. This need establishes highly traditionalist or conservative set of mind that with good reason inhibits intellectual experimentation. ... By storing knowledge outside the mind, writin...

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Redundancy … repeated … again.

Continuing the conversation regarding redundancy or repetition (from 11.21.07), this concept can be seen as a large difference in the digital orality and new media psyche, quite separate from the writing psyche. "Since redundancy characterizes oral thought and speech, it is in a profound sense mor...

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